Delayed Birth Registration/Birth Record Correction

(614) 525-3899 

Delayed Birth Registration

Appointment Preferred. Schedule an appointment: probate@franklincountyohio.gov

To apply for a Delayed Birth Registration through this Probate Court, you must have been born in the State of Ohio. You will need to provide the Court with a No-Record Letter from the Ohio Department of Health, Vital Statistics. (Note: For births that occurred prior to December 20, 1908, please contact the Probate Court in the county where the birth occurred for the search.) Once you have this No-Record Letter, you must present the Court with three valid documents to prove the exact date and place of your birth and your parents' names. Below is an example of evidence that may be used in this Court:

  • Certificate of Baptism
  • Federal Census Records
  • School records or transcripts, with an original signature from the records secretary
  • Honorable Discharge from U.S. Armed Forces (DD 214)
  • Certified copy of application for marriage license, showing vital information
  • Life insurance policies (still in effect), at least 4 years old, showing date and place of birth
  • Letter from hospital or doctor (indicating vital information) on letterhead
  • Notarized Affidavit of a witness to the birth
  • Certified copy of one child's birth certificate
  • To apply for a Delayed Birth Registration through this Proabte Court, you must have been born in the state of Ohio.

Birth Record Correction

Appointment Preferred. Schedule an appointment: probate@franklincountyohio.gov

To apply for a Birth Record Correction through this Probate Court, you must have been born in Ohio and either have: (1) been born in Franklin County, (2) your mother was a resident of Franklin County at the time of your birth or, (3) you now reside in Franklin County. You must present the Court with two valid documents to prove the information that you wish to correct. Below is an example of evidence that may be used in this Court:

  • Certificate of Baptism
  • Federal Census Records
  • School records or transcripts, with an original signature from the records secretary
  • Honorable Discharge from U.S. Armed Forces (DD 214)
  • Certified copy of application for marriage license, showing vital information
  • Life insurance policies (still in effect), at least four years old, showing date and place of birth
  • Letter from Hospital or Doctor (indicating vital information) on letterhead
  • Notarized Affidavit of a witness to the birth
  • Certified copy of one child's birth certificate

To correct the sex on an adult's birth certificate, a doctor's letter (on letterhead) stating that no surgery for sexual reassignment has taken place, is mandatory. A Questionnaire, available from the Certified Department, may also be used as evidence if it is completed by a parent or relative that is at least 10 years older than you.

Mail all required original documents to the Court. If all documents are sufficient, we will send you a completed application, which you will need to sign and have notarized. Once we receive the signed application, along with the Court costs, we will send you a certified copy of the registration, which can be used as a birth certificate for any legal purpose. (Call 614-525-3899 for current Court costs. Payment must be made by cash, certified check, cashier's check, money order, attorney's check or credit/debit card. Personal checks are NOT accepted.)

For any questions and/or to schedule an appointment for quicker application, please feel free to call at (614) 525-3899.

Record searches may be done in person, requested by U.S. Mail, or emailed to ProbateInfo@franklincountyohio.gov

For requests submitted by U.S. Mail, please send a self addressed stamped envelope with your request to the following address:

Franklin County Probate Court
ATTN: Certified Desk
373 South High Street, 22nd Floor
Columbus, Ohio 43215-6311

Legal practice in the Probate Court is restricted by law to attorneys who are licensed by the Supreme Court of Ohio. Due to the complexity of the law and desire to avoid costly errors, most individuals who have filings before the Court are represented by an attorney. Court employees are prohibited by statute from practicing law and cannot give legal advice.